Feeding birds measn alot to bird, especially during seasons when natural food sources are scarce due to harsh weather conditions or habitat loss. By offering a reliable source of nutrition, we help keep birds healthy, which in turn supports the broader ecosystem.  Additionally, observing birds can also improve mental well-being, offering a sense of peace and joy. 

Top 1: Blend of Sunflower hearts, peanut hearts, and husk-free millet

A. Peanut

1. Peanut Nutrition       

For birds, peanuts are rich in nutritional value, especially during periods of high energy consumption such as winter or the breeding season.

High energy source
Peanuts are rich in fat and protein and are an important source of energy for birds. During the cold winter months, peanuts help birds maintain body temperature and energy, providing enough calories to cope with the cold weather.

Protein supplementation
Peanuts are rich in protein, which is especially important for birds that are breeding or brooding. Protein is an essential nutrient for birds to grow and repair their tissues, and can help females lay eggs and hatch their young.

Fat reserves
The fat in peanuts is an important reserve for birds during times of food scarcity. During energy-intensive activities such as flight, incubation and protection from the cold, fat provides an extra reserve of energy to ensure that birds remain active and healthy.

Overall, peanuts are a nutrient-dense food that is vital to the health and vitality of birds. By offering peanuts as one of your bird's food choices, you can attract a wide variety of birds while helping them get the energy and nutrients they need to get on with their lives.

2. Which birds like peanuts?

Many birds enjoy peanuts as a nutritious snack. Blue jays, woodpeckers, chickadees, nuthatches, titmice, crows, ravens and jays are all birds that are often attracted to peanuts. Offering peanuts in your bird feeder will bring visitors of all feathers to your backyard to observe and enjoy.

                                           

Which Birds like to eat sunflower hearts, peanut hearts, and husk-free millet

       

【Info About Them】

1)Chickadees

What foods do they eat?
The chickadees' diet is varied and includes insects, seeds, berries, and nuts. In addition to foraging for insects and other invertebrates in trees and bushes, they readily eat seeds and nuts, including sunflower seeds, peanuts, and suet from bird feeders.

Where do they nest?
When it comes to nesting, chickadees are cavity nesters, which means they usually seek out natural or excavated nests in trees or use human-provided nest boxes. They may also utilize abandoned woodpecker holes or other suitable cavities. Female chickadees use materials such as moss, bark, and hair to build their nests, and male and female chickadees share responsibility for incubating eggs and hatching offspring.

Do they migrate?
In many areas, chickadees are known for their year-round vigor. While some chickadees (such as the black-capped chickadee) migrate short distances depending on food availability or weather conditions, they generally do not migrate long distances like other birds.

Chickadees migration map

   

2) Nuthatches

What foods do they eat?
Nuthatches eat a variety of foods, including insects, seeds, nuts, and sometimes fruit. They are known for their distinctive foraging behavior of creeping along tree trunks and branches, poking into crevices in search of insects and seeds. Nuthatches also frequent birdfeeders, eating sunflower seeds, peanuts, suet, and other foods.

Where do they nest?
When it comes to nesting, Nuthatches are cavity nesters that use natural or dug nests in trees to build their nests. They may also use nest boxes provided by humans.Nuthatches are known for being industrious nest builders, using materials such as bark strips, feathers, and hair to build their nests. They usually line the nest cavity with softer materials to create a comfortable environment for incubating eggs and raising young.

Do they migrate?
Nuthatches are primarily non-migratory birds, which means that they do not usually migrate over long distances as some other bird species do. However, some populations of certain Nuthatches species, such as the Red-breasted Nuthatches, may experience irregular migrations due to fluctuations in food availability or other environmental factors.

nuthatches migration map

3) Blue Jays

What foods do they eat?
Blue jays have a diverse diet that includes a variety of foods. They will eat insects, seeds, nuts, fruits, and occasionally small vertebrates such as frogs or fledglings. Blue jays frequent bird feeders and eat sunflower seeds, peanuts, suet, and other foods.

Where do they nest?
When it comes to nesting, blue jays usually nest in the branches of deciduous or coniferous forests. They build bulky nests of twigs, grasses, and other plant material, which are lined with finer materials such as fine roots, moss, or hair. Blue jays may also use nest boxes provided by humans.

Do they migrate?
Blue jays are primarily non-migratory birds, which means they do not migrate long distances like some other birds. However, some blue jay populations in northern regions may make short migrations based on seasonal changes in food availability or weather conditions. Overall, blue jays are usually resident birds, remaining on their breeding grounds throughout the year.

Blue Jays migration map

4) Titmice

What foods do they eat?
Titmice eat a variety of foods including insects, seeds, nuts, berries and fruits. They are opportunistic foragers and will consume a variety of foods depending on their availability. Insects and insect larvae are a particularly important food source for Titmice during the breeding season, while seeds and nuts become more important in their diet during the colder seasons.Titmice are regular visitors to birdfeeders, where they have easy access to sunflower seeds, peanuts, suet, and other foods.

Where do they nest?
When it comes to nesting, Titmice usually nest in natural cavities, including tree holes, crevices, or abandoned woodpecker holes. They may also use nest boxes provided by humans.Titmice build their nests from a variety of materials including moss, bark, leaves, grass, and feathers. Female Titmice incubates the eggs, male Titmice provides food, and both parents share the task of raising the young.

Do they migrate?
Titmice are primarily non-migratory birds, which means they do not migrate long distances like some other birds. However, some Titmice populations in northern regions may make short migrations due to fluctuations in food availability or weather conditions.

Titmice migration map

B. Sunflower Seed

1. Sunflower Seed Nutrition

Sunflower seed flakes (also known as hulled sunflower seeds) provide a variety of nutritional benefits to birds.

High energy
Sunflower seed flakes are rich in oils and provide a concentrated source of energy for birds. This is especially important during the cold season and during periods of high energy demand such as breeding and migration.

Protein
Sunflower Seed Crunch also contains protein, which is essential for muscle development, growth and overall health of birds. Protein is especially important during the breeding season, when birds need extra nutrients to support egg-laying and brood rearing.

Vitamins and Minerals
Sunflower seed flakes contain a variety of vitamins and minerals, including vitamin E, B vitamins, and minerals such as phosphorus, magnesium, and potassium. These nutrients are important for maintaining the overall health of birds, supporting metabolic functions and promoting normal growth and development.
In short, sunflower seed flakes provide birds with a nutritious, energy-packed food source that helps them stay healthy, energetic and happy all year round.

2. Which birds like sunflower seeds?

Sunflower crumbs are favored by a variety of birds, including bluebirds, goldfinchs, titmice, woodpeckers, sparrows, and jays. The high energy content and easy accessibility of sunflower seed flakes makes them popular with bird feeding enthusiasts, attracting visitors of all feathers to the backyard feeder to observe and enjoy.

1)Bluebirds

How to attract them?
To attract bluebirds to your backyard, consider providing suitable habitat and food sources. Bluebirds are cavity nesters, so providing appropriately sized and located nest boxes will encourage them to nest in your area. Place nest boxes in open areas with nearby habitat, away from dense vegetation and potential predators. Additionally, providing a clean water source and avoiding the use of pesticides can create a more attractive environment for bluebirds.

Do they migrate?
Bluebirds are primarily non-migratory, but some populations may migrate short distances based on seasonal changes in food availability or weather conditions. They usually stay on their breeding grounds throughout the year.

What foods do they eat?
Bluebirds eat a variety of foods, including insects, berries, and fruits. They feed primarily on insects during the breeding season, supplementing their diet with berries and fruits when available. Offering yellow mealworms, suet and fruit (such as chopped apples or raisins) can attract bluebirds to bird feeders.

Where do they nest?
When it comes to nesting, bluebirds prefer tree cavities or nest boxes. They will happily use a properly placed and constructed nest box. Bluebirds usually build their nests with fine grasses, feathers and other soft materials, lining the cavity to create a comfortable environment for incubating eggs and raising young.

Bluebirds migration map

2) Goldenfinches

How to attract them?
To attract American goldfinches to your yard, consider providing suitable habitat, food sources and nesting opportunities. American goldfinches prefer to roost and nest in open areas with shrubs and trees. Planting native shrubs and flowers (such as coneflowers, sunflowers, and thistles) can provide food and cover for goldfinches.

Do they migrate?
American goldfinches are primarily nonmigratory, but some populations may migrate short distances depending on food availability or weather conditions. They usually stay on their breeding grounds throughout the year.

What foods do they eat?
American goldfinches are primarily herbivorous and feed on seeds, especially during the breeding season. They are particularly fond of thistle seeds, but also eat seeds from a variety of other plants, including sunflowers, dandelions, and grasses. Offering Nyjer seeds in bird feeders is an effective way to attract goldfinches to your yard.

Where do they nest?
When it comes to nesting, American goldfinches typically build their nests in shrubs and trees, often using downy fibers from plants like milkweed and thistle. They weave these soft materials into cup-shaped nests, usually located on the fork or branch of a shrub or tree. Providing suitable nesting habitat with dense brush can encourage goldfinches to nest in your yard.

Goldenfinches migration map

3) Sparrow

How to attract them?
To attract sparrows to your yard, provide suitable habitat, food sources and nesting opportunities. Sparrows are adaptable birds commonly found in urban and suburban areas, so creating a welcoming environment in your yard can attract them. In addition, planting dense shrubs and bushes, providing bird feeders with a variety of seeds, and providing a source of fresh water can help attract sparrows.

What foods do they eat?
Sparrows eat a variety of foods, including seeds, grains, insects, and fruits. Sparrows will readily consume a variety of foods depending on their availability. Offering a mix of millet, cracked corn, and sunflower seeds in your bird feeders can attract sparrows to your yard.

Where do they nest?
For nesting, sparrows usually nest in dense shrubs, bushes or trees. They use a variety of materials (including twigs, grasses, feathers, and other plant material) to build cup-shaped nests. Sparrows will also use human-provided nest boxes if suitable natural nesting sites are scarce. Providing dense vegetation and sheltered areas can encourage sparrows to nest in your yard.

Do they migrate?
Sparrows are a diverse group of birds, with some species being migratory and others non-migratory. Many species of sparrows, such as house sparrows and white-throated sparrows, are non-migratory and stay in their breeding grounds throughout the year. However, some species of sparrows, such as the Arrow Sparrow and White-crowned Sparrow, may seasonally migrate to warmer or more food-rich areas.

sparrow migration

C. Husk Free Millet

1. Husk Free Millet Nutrition

High energy
Millet is rich in carbohydrates, which provide a valuable source of energy for birds. This energy is vital for maintaining birds' activity levels, especially during periods of high energy demand such as breeding, migration and cold weather.

Protein
Millet also contains protein, which is vital for muscle development, growth and overall health of birds. Protein is especially important during the breeding season when birds need extra nutrients to support egg production and brood rearing.

Vitamins and minerals
Millet contains a variety of vitamins and minerals, including B vitamins, iron, magnesium and phosphorus. These nutrients are important for maintaining the overall health of birds, supporting metabolic functions and promoting normal growth and development.

2. Which  birds like Millet?

Millet is a favorite food for a wide variety of birds, and common birds that enjoy millet include house finches, black-eyed goldfinches, American goldfinches, indigo buntings, northern cardinals, white-throated sparrows, and eastern towhees. Whether sprinkled on the ground or fed from a feeder, millet is a versatile and popular choice for attracting a variety of birds to your backyard.

1)Juncos

Do they migrate?
The Black-eyed Cuckoo is a migratory bird that breeds in northern North America and migrates south for the winter. During the winter, they can be found throughout much of the United States and parts of Mexico.

What foods do they eat?
In terms of diet, black-eyed juncos eat mostly seeds, especially during the winter months when insects are scarce. They forage on the ground, often looking under feeders for seeds such as millet, sunflower seeds, and cracked corn. They may also eat small insects and berries, especially during the breeding season.

Where do they nest?
Black-eyed jays usually nest in or near the ground in heavily vegetated areas such as forests, brush or grasslands. Their nests are cup-shaped and constructed of grasses, twigs, and other plant material, lined with softer materials such as moss, feathers, or hair. The female incubates the eggs and the male feeds and defends the territory.

Juncos migration

2)Towhees

Do they migrate?
Eastern Towhees are primarily non-migratory, which means they do not migrate long distances like some other birds. However, they may make some local migrations or short migrations depending on food availability or weather conditions.

What foods do they eat?
In terms of diet, Eastern Towhees forage mainly on the ground, eating a variety of seeds, insects and berries. They use their powerful beaks to scratch through fallen leaves and soil in search of food. Their diet consists of seeds from plants such as grasses, weeds, and shrubs, as well as insects, spiders, and small invertebrates.

Where do they nest?
Eastern Towhees usually nest on or near the ground in dense vegetation such as bushes, shrubs, or bushes. Their nests are constructed from twigs, leaves, grasses, and other plant material and are usually hidden in vegetation for camouflage. The female incubates the eggs and the male feeds and defends the territory.

towhee migration

3)Quail

Do they migrate?
Quail are usually non-migratory birds, which means they do not migrate long distances. Nevertheless, some species may migrate short distances in response to changes in food availability or habitat conditions.

What foods do they eat?
Quail are omnivorous birds and will consume a variety of foods depending on food availability and season. Their diet consists primarily of seeds, grains, fruits, and small invertebrates such as insects, worms, and snails.

Where do they nest?
When nesting, quail usually build their nests on the ground, often hidden in dense vegetation or grass. Female quail will select a well-concealed nesting site and build a shallow nest out of grass, leaves, and other plant material. The nest may be located at the base of a shrub or grass, which provides some protection for the quail from predation by natural predators.

Recommendation: Millbrook "No-Mess" Blend

Birdfy's Millbrook "No-Mess" Blend contains sunflower hearts, peanut hearts, and husk-free millet.

This blend is specially designed for users who prefer not to deal with hulls and seed remnants, and it is also Birdfy's best seller. The blend is a clean and nutritious mix of nuts and seeds with the hulls removed, ensuring there's never any mess from empty shells around the feeder. This means no ground mess to worry about and no extra cleaning time.

bird seed blend of sunflower hearts, peanut hearts, and husk-free millet

 

Top 2: Squirrel-Proof Safflower Bird Seed

The safflower seeds, certified as organic ingredients, provide nourishing fats, proteins, and carbohydrates for birds. They are also popular for attracting cardinals, buntings, finches, woodpeckers, grosbeaks, titmice and more. Many backyard birds will enjoy safflowers, yet squirrels typically don’t like to eat Safflower seeds.

1. Safflower Seed Nutrition

High Energy Content

The high fat content provides a significant energy source, which is especially beneficial for birds during the winter months or breeding season.

Good Source of Protein

It is essential for bird growth and helps birds prevent from winter coldness and become stronger.

Low in Saturated Fat

A healthier fat option for birds compared to seeds high in saturated fats.

Attracts Desirable Birds

Many bird species, such as cardinals, chickadees, and doves, are attracted to safflower seeds. Additionally, safflower seeds are often less attractive to squirrels and some less desirable bird species like grackles and starlings.

2. Which birds like safflower bird seed?

Many birds enjoy safflower as a nutritious snack, like northern cardinals, chickadees, titmice, house finches, are all birds that are often attracted to peanuts. Offering peanuts in your bird feeder will bring visitors of all feathers to your backyard to observe and enjoy.

backyard birds who loves safflower bird seed

 

1)Northern Cardinals

What foods do they eat?
Northern cardinals eat a variety of foods including seeds like sunflower safflower, millet, and cracked corn; fruits such as berries (blue, black, rasp, elder), grapes, apples, and cherries; grains like oats and wheat; and insects including beetles, grasshoppers, caterpillars, and spiders. They also enjoy peanuts (unsalted) and suet mixed with seeds and fruits. Providing hopper or platform feeders, spreading seeds on the ground, and offering a clean birdbath can help attract cardinals to your yard.

Where do they nest?
Northern cardinals typically nest in dense shrubs or low trees, such as honeysuckle, grapevines, dogwood, elderberry, sumac, and rose bushes, usually between 1 to 15 feet off the ground. They favor locations with thick foliage for protection, often found in gardens, backyards, forest edges, overgrown fields, and suburban areas. The female builds the nest over 3 to 9 days using twigs, bark strips, leaves, and grasses, lining it with finer materials. Providing dense, shrubby vegetation in your yard will encourage cardinals to nest there.

Do they migrate?
Northern cardinals typically do not migrate. they are year-round residents across their range. They are primarily found in the eastern and central United States, southeastern Canada, Mexico, Belize, and Guatemala. Because they do not migrate, cardinals need to find reliable food sources and suitable shelter to survive the winter months. This makes them a common sight at bird feeders and in backyards throughout the year, especially in areas where food and shelter are consistently available.

cardinal migration


How do they mate?

Song and Display: Males attract females through song and by displaying their bright red plumage. They also perform a courtship display, where they fluff up their feathers, raise their crest, and hop around the female.
Mate Feeding: A key part of courtship is mate feeding, where the male offers food to the female. This not only strengthens their bond but also demonstrates his ability to provide.

 

2) House Finches

What foods do they eat?                                                                                House finches have a diverse diet consisting of seeds such as sunflower, nyjer, millet, safflower seed, and canary seed, along with various fruits like berries, apples, cherries, and grapes. They also consume grains like oats and wheat, and occasionally insects such as aphids and ants, particularly during the breeding season. Additional food sources include nectar, peanuts, and suet. House finches can be attracted to feeders such as tube feeders, hopper feeders, and platform feeders, as well as to birdbaths with clean water. Planting native trees and shrubs can provide natural food sources and shelter, further encouraging them show in your yard.

Where do they nest?                                                                                        House finches most nest in a variety of locations including trees, shrubs, even some man-made bird houses such as Birdfy Nest, hanging planters. They prefer nesting places that has good covers and protection, and choosing dense vegetation or even some areas close to human habitation. The female constructs the nest using twigs, grasses, and other plant materials, lining it with softer materials like feathers or hair. These nests are typically cup-shaped and well-located in branches or other higher positions, since it will provide safety for baby birds and hatching.

Do they migrate?
House finches are primarily non-migratory birds, although some populations may take short-distance seasonal movements in response to changes in food availability or weather conditions. In general, they are considered year-round residents throughout much of their range, which includes North America from southern Canada to Mexico. House finches are adaptable and can be found in a variety of habitats, including urban areas, suburbs, agricultural lands, and open woodlands. Their ability to thrive in diverse environments contributes to their tendency to remain in one area year-round, with only localized movements occurring as needed.

house finch migration

3) Grosbeaks

What foods do they eat?
Grosbeaks have a diverse diet consisting of seeds such as sunflower, millet, and occasionally safflower seeds, along with various fruits like elderberries, blackberries, raspberries, cherries, and grapes. They also consume insects such as beetles, caterpillars, and ants, particularly during the breeding season. Additionally, grosbeaks may eat nuts like peanuts and almonds, as well as suet mixed with seeds and fruits, especially during the winter months for added energy. Providing hopper feeders, platform feeders, and tube feeders containing their favorite seeds, along with a birdbath for water, can attract grosbeaks to your yard and support their dietary needs year-round.

Where do they nest?
Grosbeaks typically nest in a variety of forested habitats, including mixed forests, as well as wooded areas. They tend to choose locations with rich vegetation and safety covers, such as a tree branch or shrubbery. Grosbeaks may also nest in coniferous trees. The female grosbeak constructs the nest using twigs, grasses, and other plant materials, lining it with softer materials like moss, feathers, and hair. Nests are usually cup-shaped and well-hidden within the leaves, providing safety for the eggs and hatchlings.

Do they migrate?
Yes, some species of grosbeaks are migratory birds, while others are primarily resident or partially migratory. For example, the Evening Grosbeak is a partially migratory species, meaning that some populations migrate while others remain in their breeding or wintering ranges year-round. The Evening Grosbeak migrates southward from its breeding grounds in boreal forests of Canada and Alaska to overwinter in more southern regions of North America. On the other hand, species like the Black-headed Grosbeak undertake long-distance migrations between their breeding grounds in North America and their wintering grounds in Mexico and Central America. Migration patterns can vary among grosbeak species and populations, influenced by factors such as food availability, weather conditions, and habitat changes.

Recommendation: Birdfy's Squirrel-Proof Safflower Bird Seed   

This single-origin choice is specifically designed to deter squirrels. The safflower seeds, certified as organic ingredients, provide nourishing fats, proteins, and carbohydrates to birds. They are also popular for attracting cardinals, buntings, finches, woodpeckers, grosbeaks, and more.

    Squirrel-Proof Safflower Bird Seed


Top 3: Black Oil Sunflower

1. Black Oil Sunflower Nutrition 

Calories: Around 584 calories per 100 grams.

Protein: Approximately 20.7 grams.

Fat: About 51.5 grams, primarily healthy unsaturated fats.

Vitamins and Minerals: Contains essential nutrients such as vitamin E, vitamin B6, folate, thiamine, niacin, riboflavin, magnesium, phosphorus, potassium, zinc, and iron.

2. Backyard Birds Who Love Premium Black Oil Sunflower Seed

Black oil sunflower seeds are highly popular among a diverse array of bird species due to their high energy content and nutrition value. Northern Cardinals, House Finches, Chickadees, Nuthatches, Blue Jays, Woodpeckers, American Goldfinches, House Sparrows, and Dark-eyed Juncos are among the many birds that eagerly consume these seeds. Their large size and rich nutritional profile make them an attractive food source for birds year-round, providing essential energy, protein, and a variety of vitamins and minerals. Whether offered in feeders or scattered on the ground, black oil sunflower seeds attract a wide range of avian visitors, making them a staple in backyard bird feeding.

Recommendation: Black Oil Sunflower

Birdfy also offers a single-origin choice for customers seeking exclusively black oil sunflower seeds. Our seeds, packed with healthy fats, proteins, and minerals, are sourced from organic farms. They provide valuable nutrition to give birds the energy and nutrients they need in all seasons.

Black Oil Sunflower Bird Seed



Top 4: Black oil sunflower, hemp, millet and safflower

This blend is specially designed for users who prefer not to deal with hulls and seed remnants, and it is also Flying Colors' best seller. The blend is a clean and nutritious mix of nuts and seeds with the hulls removed, ensuring there's never any mess from empty shells around the feeder. This means no ground mess to worry about and no extra cleaning time.

1.  Which birds like black oil sunflower, hemp, millet and safflower?

Black Oil Sunflower Seeds: Northern Cardinals, House Finches, Chickadees, Nuthatches, Blue Jays, Woodpeckers, American Goldfinches, House Sparrows, Dark-eyed Juncos, White-breasted Nuthatches, Red-breasted Nuthatches, Tufted Titmouse, and American Tree Sparrow.

Hemp Seeds: Finches (e.g., House Finches, American Goldfinches), Sparrows (e.g., House Sparrows, White-crowned Sparrows), Buntings (e.g., Indigo Buntings), and Towhees.

Millet Seeds: Sparrows (e.g., House Sparrows, White-crowned Sparrows, Song Sparrows), Buntings (e.g., Indigo Buntings, Painted Buntings), Cardinals, Juncos, and Towhees.

Safflower Seeds: Northern Cardinals, House Finches, Chickadees, Nuthatches, House Sparrows, Dark-eyed Juncos, Mourning Doves, White-breasted Nuthatches, Red-breasted Nuthatches, Tufted Titmouse, American Tree Sparrow, and Grosbeaks.

Offering a mix of these seeds can attract a diverse range of bird species to your feeders, providing them with essential nutrients and contributing to the enjoyment of bird watching in your backyard.

Recommendation: Woodstock “Hempy” Blend

Birdfy's Woodstock “Hempy” Blend contains black oil sunflower, hemp, millet and safflower.

This blend is specially designed for users who prefer not to deal with hulls and seed remnants, and it is also Flying Colors' best seller. The blend is a clean and nutritious mix of nuts and seeds with the hulls removed, ensuring there's never any mess from empty shells around the feeder. This means no ground mess to worry about and no extra cleaning time.

black oil sunflower, hemp, millet and safflower.


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May 29, 2024 — Joy Li

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